After its three-day spring meeting, which was held via video conference, Naturland appeals to the Federal Government to get the planned Supply Chain Act off the ground before the end of this legislative period.

In March the implementation of the planned Supply Chain Act, which is intended to oblige companies to guarantee the observance of human rights and environmental standards globally, was halted. Containment of the corona pandemic had priority, the German government argued. Now, Hans Bartelme, vice-president of Naturland’s association, demanded that the law should urgently be brought forward.

Digital meeting

This demand is one of the results of the three-day digital meeting, which this year in mid-May replaced Naturland’s regular spring meeting. The international advisory board of the organic farming association met via video conference for discussions with the delegates from Africa, Asia, Latin America and Europe. Among other things, they reported on the challenges currently facing the people in their home countries.

Dr. Hubby Matthew of PDS Organic Spices, one of Naturland’s Indian partners, reported, for example, on unemployment among day labourers and the simultaneous rise in food prices; families had to be supported with food packages. Against this background, the Naturland delegates unanimously appealed to the federal government to get the planned Supply Chain Act off the ground right now.

“What we need now is solidarity in the crisis and the establishment of transparent, socially and ecologically sustainable supply chains”, stressed Bartelme. Dieter Overath, CEO of TransFair, also set the same course in an interview with the Lebensmittelzeitung (lebensmittelzeitung.net): “The Supply Chain Act is necessary not in spite of, but because of Corona,” he is quoted in issue 20 of the newspaper.

Initiative Supply Chain Law

The Naturland delegates reiterated their support for the “Supply Chain Initiative”. The association of organisations such as BUND, Bread for the World, Greenpeace, Oxfam and the trade unions DGB and Verdi are, according to their own statements, “committed to a world in which companies respect human rights and avoid environmental destruction”.